Cheasty Greenspace is a forest of about 50 acres in urban South Seattle.   Although many parts of this forest are covered in invasive species (and these sections need urgent restoration work to be done – see below!), there are thriving sections with substantial native understory and native deciduous canopy as well.

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When you go, you will see different kinds of plants and animals.  The following is a list of some of the plants and animals you might see while exploring Cheasty Greenspace.  There are probably more.  Contribute to this ongoing study by sending us your observations of plant and animal life from this forest.  Provide as much detail as you can to Forest@Cheasty.org.

You might see shrubs and other understory plants like:

Bracken Fern

Deer Fern

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Evergreen Huckleberry

False-Lily-of-the-Valley  

Goat’s Beard

Indian Plum

Maidenfern

Oceanspray

Oregon Grape, or Mahonia

Pacific Rhododendron

Red Elderberry

Rose

Salal

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Salmonberry

Snowberry

Stinging Nettle

Sword Fern

Trailing Blackberry

Thimbleberry

Trillium

Vanilla Leaf  

 

Look for trees like:

Big Leaf Maple

Cascara

Douglas Fir

Grand Fir

Red Alder 

Pacific Yew

Vine Maple

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Western Hemlock

Western Red Cedar

 

Birds you might see in or near Cheasty include:

American Crow

American Robin

Anna’s Hummingbird

Bewick’s Wren

Black-capped Chickadee

Brown Creeper

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Bushtit  

Cedar Waxwing

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

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Coopers Hawk

Dark-eyed Junco

Downy Woodpecker

European Starling

Fox Sparrow

Glaucous-winged Gull

Golden-crowned Kinglet

House Finch

House Sparrow

Merlin

Northern Flicker

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Olive-sided Flycatcher

Osprey 

Pacific-slope Flycatcher

Pileated Woodpecker

Pine Siskin  

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Rufous Hummingbird

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Red Tailed Hawk

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Song Sparrow

Spotted Towhee

Steller’s Jay

Townsend’s Warbler

Vaux’s Swift

Western Tanager

Wilson’s Warbler

Yellow Warbler

 

Wild animals at Cheasty are difficult to spot, but may include:

Bat 

Coyote 

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Deer 

Opossum 

Rabbit 

Raccoon 

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Tree Squirrel 

For more information about our native Pacific Northwest forests and the species that thrive in them, explore the following websites:

King County- Native Forest

Unfortunately, many parts of the forest are currently infested with invasive species of plants that effectively out-compete and inhibit the growth of our native plants.  These invasive plants arrived in our forests through various routes, difficult to trace now.  Many were deliberately planted in gardens throughout the region because of their ability to grow well under our local conditions.  Unfortunately, many have grown too well, have escaped their original garden confines, and now infest our local forests, inhibiting the growth of our native plants.  Other invasive plants arrived surreptitiously, as seeds hidden in the soil of nursery plants or stuck in the treads of our shoes when we travel across ecosystems. A significant part of our restoration work is pulling out these invasive bullies so that our native treasures can flourish. 

Invasive weeds targeted for removal include:

 Cherry Laurel

English Holly

English Ivy

Herb Robert

Himalayan Blackberry

To learn more about noxious weeds in the Seattle area and what you can do to help protect our native ecosystem, explore the following websites:

 King County- Noxious Weeds

To learn more about our practices for restoring this native ecosystem, see Green Seattle Partnership and Seattle reLeaf.

 

*  While almost all photographs at Cheasty.org are taken by volunteers in Cheasty Greenspace, most close-ups on this page were borrowed from sources in the public domain.  Please help us build an all-Cheasty resource, by sending your photos of flora and fauna at Cheasty to forest@cheasty.org.